Concussion Management Plan

 

If you suspect your child may have sustained a concussion, Additional concussion information can be found on their website at www.stlukesonline.org/concussion.
 

The Bogus Basin Ski Education Foundation 

Concussion Management Plan

October 2021

 

Contents

  1. Parent/Athlete Meeting                                                      

  2. Concussion Training for Coaches and staff                            

  3. Removal from Play Strategy    

  4. Return to Learn Strategy                                                                       

  5. Return to Sport Strategy                                                                      

Forms

BBSEF Acknowledgement Form

BBSEF Return to Participation Medical Release

 

ATTENTION

This concussion management plan is provided for the free and personal use of the public to help school districts or various youth sport organizations comply with Idaho Code Section 33-1625.  However, this document does not provide legal advice and is not a substitute for legal advice.  Individuals or organizations with compliance concerns are encouraged to consult legal counsel.

 

(1)  Parent/Athlete Meeting

  1. Prior to the start of each athletic season, a meeting shall be organized by the club director or other appropriate designated official to discuss the topic of concussion in youth sports. 
  2. Each athlete planning on participating in the sport shall attend the meeting with the parent or legal guardian of the athlete.
    1. Parents, athletes and coaches should review the following material and have the opportunity to ask questions:
      1. The definition of concussion
      2. Signs and symptoms of the injury
      3. Tips for prevention of the injury
      4. Risks associated with continued play with a concussion
      5. What to do if you suspect someone has sustained a concussion for emergency and non-emergency situations
      6. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) 4 step action plan:
        1. Remove suspected injured athletes from play.
        2. Ensure the athlete is evaluated right away by an appropriate health care professional.
        3. Inform the athlete’s parents or guardians about the possible concussion and give them the fact sheet on concussion.
        4. Allow the athlete to return to sport only with permission from a health care professional with experience in evaluating concussion.
      7. Any additional concussion resources provided to parents, athletes and coaches

 

  1. Required Parent/Guardian Written Consent Form 
    1. Prior to beginning practice the athlete and the athlete’s parent or guardian must receive and sign a “Parent/Guardian Written Consent Form” regarding concussion in youth sports. This form is an acknowledgement by the parent and athlete that they have received the education detailed under subsection (3) of section 33-1625, Idaho Code, that they understand the material and have had an opportunity to ask questions. 
      1. Parent/Guardian Written Consent forms should be kept on file for no less than seven (7) years by the Bogus Basin Ski Education Foundation.

(2) Biennial Concussion Training - Coaches & Staff

  1. Coaches & Staff:
    1. All coaches and staff must receive online concussion training upon hire and biennially thereafter.
      1. Completion of the Idaho Concussion Training Course provided by the Idaho High School Activities Association and the St. Luke’s Sports Medicine Concussion Clinic shall satisfy this requirement. 
  2. The course can be found at the following link:  https://www.stlukesonline.org/apps/concussion-education
  3. Evidence of training must be kept on file by the Bogus Basin Ski Education Foundation.

 

(3) Removal From Play Strategy

Coaches & non-medical staff

STEP 1:  REMOVE FROM PLAY

If at any time it is suspected an athlete has sustained a concussion during practice or game play, the youth athlete shall be immediately removed from play and not be allowed to return to sport the same day. Once removed an athlete shall not be allowed to return to sport until authorized to return by a qualified health care professional.

Please Note: Most athletes who experience concussion will exhibit any one or more of a variety of symptoms. A loss of consciousness is NOT always present. Headache is the most common symptom, but not all athletes experience concussion in the same way. Symptoms of a concussion may not be evident until several minutes, hours or days later. The severity of the symptoms will also vary along with their duration. The following are a list of possible common symptoms by general category:

STEP 2: MONITOR 

Continue monitoring the athlete for other signs and symptoms, as well as for symptom severity. If the athlete is experiencing any of the below signs, the parents or guardians of the athlete may want to transport the athlete to the nearest emergency room. In the absence of a parent or guardian, or when in doubt about what action to take, call 911 immediately.

  1. Headache that gets worse or does not go away
  2. Weakness, numbness or decreased coordination
  3. Slurred speech
  4. Looks very drowsy or cannot be awakened
  5. Cannot recognize people or places
  6. Is getting more and more confused, restless, or agitated

STEP 3:  IS THERE AN EMERGENCY?

If the condition of the athlete continues to deteriorate or if an athlete exhibits ANY of the below signs, call 911 immediately and launch your organization’s emergency action plan:

  1. Repeated vomiting or nausea. 
  2. Has one pupil (the black part in the middle of the eye) larger than the other. 
  3. Experiences convulsions or seizures. 
  4. Prolonged loss of consciousness (a brief loss of consciousness should be taken seriously and the person should be carefully monitored). 

STEP 4:  ENSURE THE ATHLETE RECEIVES A MEDICAL EVALUATION

If not an emergency, ensure the injured athlete is evaluated by a proper medical professional. DO NOT try to judge the seriousness of the injury yourself. Coaches should seek assistance from the site athletic trainer or other appropriate medical personnel if available at a competition, and should always seek the assistance from an appropriate medical provider when an injury occurs at practice. If a medical provider is not available on site, ensure that the parents or guardians of the athlete follow-up with an appropriate medical provider.

STEP 5:  COMMUNICATE

Contact the athlete’s parents or guardians as soon as possible to inform them of the potential injury and provide them a factsheet on concussion available online by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Communicate the injury to your organization’s director or other appropriate personnel in a timely fashion.

(4)       Return-to-Learn Strategy

  1. Under subsection (7) of section 33-1625, Idaho Code it reads “Students who have sustained a concussion and return to school may need informal or formal accommodations, modifications of curriculum, and monitoring by a medical or academic staff until the student is fully recovered.  A student athlete should be able to resume all normally scheduled academic activities without restrictions or the need for accommodation prior to receiving authorization to return to play by a qualified health care professional as defined in subsection (6) of this section.
  2. The athletic trainer, school nurse, school counselor or other appropriate designated school administrator shall communicate and collaborate with the athlete, parents or guardians of the athlete, coaches, teachers and any necessary and pertinent outside medical professionals of the athlete, to create a plan that will support the athlete’s academic and personal needs while symptomatic.
  3. Supporting a student recovering from a concussion requires a collaborative approach among school professionals, health care providers, parents or guardians of the athlete, as well as the athlete themselves, as s/he may need accommodations during recovery. Keep in mind that the accommodations that worked for one athlete may not work for another.
  4. If symptoms persist, accommodations for the student such as a 504 plan may be pertinent. A 504 plan is implemented when students have a disability (temporary or permanent) that affects their performance in any manner. Services and accommodations for students may include environmental adaptations, curriculum modifications, and behavioral strategies. The decision to implement a 504 plan should be arrived at through collaboration of all parties involved.
  5. Students may need to limit activities while they are recovering from a concussion. Exercising or activities that involve a lot of concentration, such as studying, working on the computer, or playing video games, may cause concussion symptoms (such as headache or tiredness) to reappear or get worse. Students who return to school after a concussion may need to:
    1. Take rest breaks as needed
    2. Spend fewer hours at school
    3. Be given more time to take tests or complete assignments
    4. Receive help with schoolwork
    5. Reduce time spent on the computer, reading, or writing
  6. It is normal for students to feel frustrated, sad, and even angry because they cannot return to recreation or sports right away, or cannot keep up with their schoolwork. A student may also feel isolated from peers and social networks. Talk with the student about these issues and offer support and encouragement. As the student’s symptoms decrease, the extra help or support can be removed gradually as decided on by the team involved.
  7. As the athlete returns to academic and athletic activities the athletic trainer, school nurse, school counselor or other appropriate school personnel shall follow-up with the athlete periodically to ensure symptoms are decreasing, have been eliminated and have not returned, or to address any additional concerns of the athlete and the athlete’s parents or guardians, and to adjust the academic and return to school strategy for the athlete if needed until the athlete has been fully reintegrated into normal academic activities.
  8. The following 4 step progression is available as a general guideline for the athlete, the parents or guardians of the athlete, medical providers, and school professionals to reference for return to school purposes.

 

 

(5) Return to Sport Strategy

 

Athletic trainers or other appropriate medical providers

 

  1. An injured athlete should only be allowed to start the following return to sport strategy once the athlete is successfully tolerating their normal cognitive workload at school.
  2. An athlete cleared to play by a qualified medical professional only provides clearance for the athlete to begin the stepwise return to sport strategy as set forth in section (d) below, unless the athlete has been directed through the stepwise return to sport progression by the outside medical provider(s) prior to being cleared. Administrators, coaches and parents must act reasonably and to the best of their ability to ensure an athlete is cleared by a proper medical provider experienced in the evaluation and management of concussion pursuant to subsection (6) of section 33-1625, Idaho Code.
    1. Clearance by a medical provider must be in written form and kept on file with the Bogus Basin Ski Education Foundation for no less than seven (7) years.
  3. If at any time, the athletic trainer or other qualified medical personnel feel the injury is beyond their expertise, scope of practice or comfort level, then the athlete shall be referred to a qualified health care professional trained in the evaluation and management of concussion for treatment and management of the injury.
    1. It is the responsibility of the athletic trainer or other on-site medical personnel to ensure that proper and sufficient communication takes place with any/all outside medical professionals to ensure medical providers have all pertinent medical information, are accurately informed of the details and severity of the injury, and that the medical provider receiving the referral is qualified to evaluate and manage concussions.
  4. The return of an athlete to play shall be done in a stepwise fashion in accordance with the recommended return to sport strategies of the CDC and the NFHS. Proper instruction and supervision of an outside medical provider should be used if necessary. A parent or legal guardian should supervise each step of the return to sport process and should communicate regularly with coaches of the athlete to inform them of the athlete’s progress. 
    1. The return to return to sport strategy includes the following stepwise progression allowing the athlete 24 hours between each step as long as the athlete remains symptom free. If any symptoms return, the athlete should return to the previous step and resume the progression again following 24 hours without symptoms.

 

The athlete should not Return to Sport unless they have resumed all normally scheduled academic activities without restrictions or the need for accommodations prior to receiving authorization to Return to Sport by a qualified healthcare professional as defined in subsection (6) of section 33-1625, Idaho code

Graduated Return-to-Sport Strategy 

Stage #

Aim

Activity

Goal of each step

Initial period of 24-48 hours of both relative physical & cognitive rest is recommended

before beginning the Return to Sport Progression

1

Symptom-limited activity

Daily activities that do not worsen symptoms

Gradual reintroduction of work/school activities

If symptoms worsen with this level of exertion, then return to previous stage. If the student remains symptom free for 24 hours after this level of exertion then proceed to the next stage.

2

Light aerobic exercise

Walking or stationary cycling at slow to medium pace.  No resistance training

Increase heart rate

If symptoms re-emerge with this level of exertion, then return to previous stage. If the student remains symptom free for 24 hours after this level of exertion then proceed to the next stage.

3

Sport-specific exercise

Running or skating drills.  No head impact activities

Add movement

If symptoms re-emerge with this level of exertion, then return to previous stage. If the student remains symptom free for 24 hours after this level of exertion then proceed to the next stage.

4

Non-contact training drills

Harder training drills, e.g., passing drills.  May start progressive resistance training

Exercise, coordination and increased thinking

If symptoms re-emerge with this level of exertion, then return to previous stage. If the student remains symptom free for 24 hours after this level of exertion then proceed to the next stage.

5

Full contact practice

Following medical clearance, participate in normal training activities

Restore confidence and assess functional skills by coaching staff

If symptoms re-emerge with this level of exertion, then return to previous stage. If the student remains symptom free for 24 hours after this level of exertion then proceed to the next stage with physician clearance.

Return to Sport

Normal game play

Fully back to sport 

 

McCrory P, et al. Br J Sports Med 2017;0:1-10.doi:10.1136/bjssports-2017-097699.